Royal Enfield Himalayan hits North America

The Royal Enfield Himalayan adventure bike has finally been confirmed for sale in North America, but has yet to appear on the Canadian website.

But, that doesn’t mean the bike isn’t coming to Canada. The Himalayan isn’t featured on the US site either, but Royal Enfield has confirmed the machine will sell in the States for a reasonable $4,499. At current exchange rates, that works out to about $5,765 CAD.

Assuming the Himalayan comes to Canada, that’s probably the price range the bike would have to be in. That’s not much more than most of the 250 Japanese dual sport range, which typically retails in $5,000 territory (currently the Honda CRF250L has a $5,599 MSRP in Canada and the Kawasaki KLX250 carries a $5,599 MSRP in our market). The Himalayan is close to those 250s in its performance, and definitely needed to come in under the 650 dual sports in pricing ($7,199 for the Kawasaki KLR650 right now, and $6,299 for the Suzuki DR650).

So when will it show up here? We haven’t been given a firm date, but we’d guess this summer, if the US is getting it for 2018. And when it gets here, we’ll finally know the answer to the question we’ve had since this bike first appeared in concept form: Has India finally learned how to build a bike tough enough for real-world adventure riding use?

8 thoughts on “Royal Enfield Himalayan hits North America”

  1. I have had no problems with my 2017 Continental gt 535. Ran it all summer without any issues. It’s a fun and real retro cafe racer, and it looks terrific with a Motad aftermarket exhaust and bar end mirrors. It really feels like an old British single. I have owned much faster bikes such as a Ducati and a Suzuki TL1000, and now a Triumph Thruxton, but nothing makes me smile like this long stroke single cylinder bike. The Himalayan uses a different engine.

    1. Great, I love those. The Himalayan is an “all new engine built in a new factory”. Maybe RE brought it to market too soon?

    1. The best-looking factory cafe racer on the market, I’d say. Their styling team is top-rate. No wonder, they’re based in England and working with tech that isn’t far off from the original 60s stuff.

      1. This is certainly the biggest problem RE faces now. If they can get a reputation for reliability that is equal to Japan, the next decade is theirs. If not, well, they’ll eventually run out of unwitting customers to sell to.

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