Honda updates Super Cub models

Honda is updating its most successful two-wheeler ever, the Super Cub, bringing a restyling to both the 50 cc and 110 cc models.

Originally introduced in 1958, Honda has sold 100 million Cubs in the decades since; more than half of those have been sold since 2005, when Honda hit the 50 million mark. It’s the most popular motorcycle in the world, and if you counted in the knock-offs built by other Asian countries, the number would be even more impressive.

For 2018, the Super Cub is getting a visual update, with lines that bring back recollections of the original model from the 1950s. It’s still powered by an air-cooled single-cylinder motor, the trusty 49 cc or 109 cc unit that Honda perfected years ago. And hey, check out those drum brakes, front and rear! But the bikes have EFI, LED lighting, new instruments, and come in a Pro version, with 14-inch wheels instead of the standard 17-inch hoops. The Pro look is enhanced by the addition of a shopping basket up front, which we’re sure is Ed March-approved. Maybe he was a consultant on this re-design?

Honda Canada hasn’t said anything about bringing this bike back to our shores, and frankly, we can’t see that ever happening. But maybe that new Grom-based Cub could be here soon? Stay tuned.

9 thoughts on “Honda updates Super Cub models”

  1. The biggest selling motorcycle in the world not available in Canda is a disgrace really. We need the motorcycle community to step up and deal with Honda Canada, provincial and federal governments to make it happen. I for one would be part of that group. It’s about market demand, emission regulations and import rules. Let’s make a change.

    1. I believe it is, although I have never seen one on the road.

      I don’t understand why SYM’s products aren’t a lot more popular, because they’re exactly what hipsters are looking for, right down to the price. The only thing they don’t have is a lot of power, but that doesn’t matter in an urban environment, at least not as much.

      1. SYM has never had a dealer network big enough to support what (I believe) is a very good product.
        That appears to be the downfall of a lot of the other smaller players – see: Kymco.
        If you’re looking for an urban assault unit you’re more likely to stick with the Japanese big 4.

        1. Good point. I have never seen a SYM dealer in the east coast region.

          If I was going to ride around the world at slow speed, I’d buy a SYM probably.

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