New motor breaks ground for Royal Enfield

Single overhead cam! Oil cooler! Fuel injection! Four valves per cylinder! None of these technologies are cutting-edge, but they’re a step forward for Royal Enfield.

Royal Enfield announced its new twin-cylinder 650 at EICMA, and it’s a promising step forward for the company. True, most of this is ground the Japanese covered in the 1970s and 1980s, but if you want to run, first you gotta learn to walk. Right now, Royal Enfield is a company that’s learning to walk, after crawling along, getting by on 1950s-era designs for many decades.

This engine was designed in Royal Enfield’s British technology centre, which was founded back in 2015. Claimed output is 47 hp at 7,100 rpm, and 39 lb-ft of torque at 4,000 rpm. Modest numbers, but again, improvements on Royal Enfield’s previous production.

It has 78mm bore and 67.8mm stroke, with 270-degree crank. There’s a balancer shaft as well, so this machine shouldn’t rattle and roll like the classic Brit bikes did. Hopefully, you’ll have to worry less about pieces falling off while you ride down the road than you did on an old Sunbeam.

We expect to see more details on the bike based on this new engine (officially called the Royal Enfield 648) soon.

3 thoughts on “New motor breaks ground for Royal Enfield”

  1. LOL learning to walk.. barely getting by… meanwhile they’re having their best sales *ever*.

    60k units/month, and trending upward.

    https://img.newatlas.com/indian-motorcycle-market-turmoil-triumph-bajaj-28.png?auto=format%2Ccompress&ch=Width%2CDPR&dpr=2&fit=clip&h=700&q=40&w=616&s=9125c7885527042c738c7af437c4509a

    Royal Enfield sells most of its bikes in markets where reliability and repairability are of paramount importance. “Learning to walk” hardly applies here, “barely getting by” even less.

    Looks like a really good design. I’m looking forward to seeing them on the floor, maybe even trying one if it’s possible.

  2. It’s a good looking engine. I like how they’ve kept the height of the head in proportion with the height of the cylinder block. Many modern engines are rather tall, and don’t look good in a classic/retro application.

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