How to do the Trans Canada Adventure Trail

The route

CMG: I saw a lot of photos of water crossings. How did these affect the trip? Were they dangerous?

KL: Yes a lot of water crossings, but most not very deep. We were worried about snakes (none in New Zealand). We pre-walked a few, but overall, they were not a problem.

A lot of people say Canada’s prairies are boring. Are they more exciting to ride across off-road? What makes it different to trail-ride across Manitoba/Saskatchewan, as opposed to the street?

Just another day on the trails. Rain-flooded trails were a big part of the TCAT during this ride,

That was not our experience. As per Ted, it is an expedition not simply a ride and we enjoyed 99 per cent of the route. Certainly the remoteness of the back country was most enjoyable.

What were the similarities to the TAT (Trans American Trail), and what were the differences?

The TAT was about five weeks and 9,000 km; the TCAT, two full months and 18,000 km, but both included sandy deserts and snowy high country. To a point, ADV riding is the same wherever, but I think we had more interaction with local folk in the States due to the number of small towns we passed through.

While the trip passes through a lot of remote territory, does the TCAT also give riders a chance to visit major Canadian cities along the route as well?

We had two rest days in Ottawa, and some time in Vancouver at the end. Otherwise the route was mainly small towns or minor cities (thankfully).

3 thoughts on “How to do the Trans Canada Adventure Trail”

  1. I have read many articles on the TAT and TCAT, and never get tired of the reads. Not many of us can take months out or our lives to do something as epic as this, so I appreciate the effort those Kiwi’s put into it! I live in the “boring prairies”, but if I had time to meander across our massive country, it would be a dream come true.

    Small bore 250cc bikes seem to be the right choice to do most everything!

  2. Actually, it’s mostly from Thunder Bay to Sioux Lookout where the washouts have occurred in the Northwestern Ontario section the rest of the route is in better shape.

  3. Wow. Loved this interview Zac. I know the TCAT between Thunder Bay and Kenora is washed out in places and virtually impassible currently. I’ve hosted a few riders who have tried to conquer the original section solo with no success (and ultimately suffered both broken bones and bike in the process). Riding it solo isn’t advised, as mentioned. I must say that I’m proud that a bunch of Kiwis did this on WR250Rs though. There’s very little that the WR250R can’t do.

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