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Don’t See a Motorcycle You Like? Build One Yourself!

One of the great things about motorcycles is that they are still accessible to change by the everyday rider. Unlike cars, computers and most other consumer products, increases in sophistication and the inclusion of advanced technologies have not separated the owner of a bike from the simple joy of home-brewed modification.

While for most this means bolting on accessories or performance products, there are those garage inventors who take it upon themselves to design their own, rideable prototype motorcycles. The question is are they True Believers or just plain crazy?

The garage tinkerer is intrinsic to the motorcycle experience. But so is the one-of-a-kind custom builder. I am not talking about the army of stylish hipsters or leather clad chopper guys who grind an existing frame and build it up using parts from other production bikes. I refer to the type of person that designs a bike from the ground up, fabricating frames, bodies, even sometimes whole engines, from scratch.

They are the true holders of the term “custom bike builder”.

Throughout the motorcycle world there have been countless of such custom builders, but what is particularly interesting to me is not so much the bikes as understanding the motivations behind these people.  What drove them to go to such great lengths to satisfy their motorcycle habit.

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Thousands of hours in fabrication. The frame, wheels, body and suspension are all bespoke on the Krugger BMW K1600. Best of all it is a working, rideable motorcycle.

Looking at the past thirty or forty years of bespoke motorcycles, certain patterns become visible.  For many,  constructing a dream machine was an obvious exercise in the pursuit of new levels of performance.   Some sought wealth, toiling at inventions in the hopes of building a new commercial empire.  For others, the journey was spawned because they could not find the bike they wanted so they chose to build it themselves.  Finally, some simply build one-of-a-kind motorcycles because it is something enormously fun to do.

A Faster Horse

High on the totem of justifications for building a one-off motorcycle is the search for speed. And perhaps the best known and most venerated  ground up custom builders was John Britten. Britten’s desire to push the performance threshold of large displacement twins drove him to craft, with the help of many others, one of the most remarkable motorcycles of any kind in the modern age.

The Britten V1000. Everything you see before you bar the tires and basic hardware was made bespoke.
The Britten V1000. Everything you see before you bar the tires and basic hardware was made bespoke.

The Britten V1000 was literally made from scratch. Not content to make his own carbon fibre chassis, Britten chose to design, manufacture, test and assemble almost everything himself. The motor was bespoke, including the pistons, crankshaft, exhaust and a large part of the electronics. The body was hand crafted, the suspension forks hand laid up in carbon fibre and cured in his home-built autoclave oven. Britten even made his own wheels!

John Britten’s obsessions were weight and component efficiency. He demanded that every part serve these twin goals, which is a pretty common trait among motivated engineering types, but his methodology was entirely unique. Rather than depend on hard calculations, simulation or the deep knowledge of establishment players, he decided largely on his own what to prioritize in the design and development process, mostly by instinct.

That's a homemade, 180 hp racing motorcycle engine right there. What did you do with your evenings last winter?
That’s a homemade, 180 hp racing motorcycle engine right there. What did you do with your evenings last winter?

In a similar turn of events, American architect Michael Czysz led a small team of five to design, build and race a 120 hp electric superbike in just three months, to compete in the world’s first modern electric motorcycle race at the 2009 Isle of Man TT.  Like Britten, the motorcycle was bespoke, from the frame, to the high voltage battery, to the patented front suspension.  Also like Britten, he failed in his first attempt but came back a year later with another, all new motorcycle design full of newer still engineering ideas.  Czysz would go on to win the electric TT category four times.

The 2009 Motoczysz E1PC electric racing bike debuted at the Isle of Man. Scratch-built in months, it was itself based on the stillborn but also scratch-built Motoczysz MotoGP prototype.
The 2009 Motoczysz E1PC electric racing bike debuted at the Isle of Man. Scratch-built in months, it was itself based on the stillborn but also scratch-built Motoczysz MotoGP prototype.

The Britten V1000 and Motoczysz E1PC are without a doubt some of the most amazing motorcycles ever made, partly because they became extremely competitive in a very short time, but mostly because of their origins. Using the resources available to a middle-aged, full-time employed family man, Britten and a small team developed a very well resolved design that could race evenly against privateer Ducatis armed with factory race parts.  Michael Czysz, an architect, crushed venture-backed companies armed with dozens of full-time engineers and technicians in just his second year.

There are many other examples of ground up builds that were spawned by the need to go faster.  Ex formula one racer and team owner Dan Gurney built his foot-forward Gator because he was convinced that the lower center of gravity made for a better handling bike. Spanish engineer David Sanchez created the BOTTPOWER Morlacco and later a host of bespoke racing and road bikes, while I and a team of enthusiasts attempted to find speed in frugality with the Amarok P1.  All of these projects existed to find speed and in doing so satisfy the builder’s ego, to prove them and their ideas right at the altar of racing.

Manufactured in low numbers and sold as the ultimate American sport touring machine, the Gurney Gator was nevertheless inspired by the belief that a low center of gravity equalled better handling.
Manufactured in low numbers and sold as the ultimate American sport touring machine, the Gurney Gator was nevertheless inspired by the belief that a low center of gravity equals better handling.  What else would a former formula one racer demand in a road vehicle?

There’s Gonna be a Revolution

Every now and again, someone comes out of a dimly lit workshop and emerges into the brilliant light of the internet with a prototype motorcycle they promise will revolutionize the world. These types of project are typically born from some technical innovation, such as a patentable method of production, engineering layout, or material application that allows the one-of-a-kind prototype to do something others can’t.

There are many levels of home built efforts, from slick to modest. Above, electric motorcycle pioneer Cedric Lynch shows off his daily rider.
There are many levels of home-built efforts, from slick to modest. Above, electric motorcycle pioneer Cedric Lynch shows off his daily rider.

The electric motorcycles that popped up in large numbers between 2008 and 2012 were a mixed bag of True Believers and commercial opportunists.  Some, such as Zero Motorcycles founder Neal Saiki were driven by altruistic beliefs in the superiority of electric drive, some, myself included, saw battery power as a new avenue of design and engineering to explore, others simply saw the chance to cash in.

As exciting as they were, many of the first wave of electric motorcycles made little sense to consumers, given the cost and relative performance.  But that didn’t stop hundreds to try and convert their own motorcycle to electric power and the bold to go at it from the ground up.  The finish quality and engineering ranged from the sublime OEM levels of execution of the Mission R, to the downright scary.

John Parson's in-line 3 wheeler. Draw your own conclusions. http://bit.ly/1VFiZPm
John Parson’s in-line 3 wheeler. Draw your own conclusions about its merits.

While these projects rarely raise much money, they do raise a lot of eyebrows. From whacky leaning three-wheelers, to the low slung foot-forward designs, bikes made from bonded bamboo fibre and bikes powered by diesel, there is no shortage of genuine innovation in the motorcycle universe, but very few of those radical projects deflected the course of motorcycle history.

Safety First

One garage theme that consistently emerges among the others is the idea of adding passive safety features to motorcycles. The motorcycle, as it exists, is a thoroughly unsafe vehicle at any speed, lacking any passive occupant safety features whatsoever. A car’s passenger cell, crumple zones, airbags and seat belts are all passive safety technologies. They go to work only once a collision is taking place. While a motorcyclist is able, arguably more than any other motorist, to actively avoid a collision situation by using the superior maneuverability of motorcycles, if they should actually participate in a collision the rider is on their own.

The coolest and safest motorcycle in the world, according to its designer.
The coolest and safest motorcycle in the world, according to its designer.

One approach is to simply wrap a motorcycle in the loving embrace of a steel safety cage, which is what Hungarian designer László Pere has done. His design, which he calls “the coolest and safest motorcycle in the world” places the rider into a car seat with a seatbelt, and surrounds him in heavy gage tubing. It is undoubtedly safer in a crash than a normal motorcycle, but given that his Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign raised just $40 out of $40,000 he wanted for prototyping, the market obviously did not agree.

Other efforts applied similar thinking, but with the addition of a third wheel. French engineer Philippe Girardi has spent many years and developed a number of three-wheelers with the aim of reducing motorcycle related road deaths, an admirable pursuit. Starting with the logical reasoning that a leaning three-wheeled cycle would eliminate a majority of tip-over and slide related accidents, he created first the Pulsar, which took full advantage of a surrounding roll cage, then more recently the Torga, which replaced the roll cage with a wearable fairing/crumple zone.

Wear your own crumple zone. It's also skid protection. And an aerodynamic aid.
Wear your own crumple zone. It’s also skid protection. And an aerodynamic aid.

Leaving aside for the moment the near complete failure of three-wheeled cycles to provide dynamic stability throughout the 120 year history of the motorcycle, the wearable crumple zone may actually be the most significant safety innovation in the last few years. D30 deformable armor, now available in most quality riding suits, is proven to reduce impact injury a lot.

But it didn’t come from a garage builder, and it certainly didn’t ask motorcyclists to wear the front fairing strapped onto their chests.  Safety in motorcycles is a serious business, but despite heroic and truly well intentioned efforts, the garage inventor is unlikely to produce the needed breakthroughs.

New and Improved Does Not Equal Payday

Building a complete motorcycle from scratch is a huge task for an OEM, never mind a guy in his garage. So it’s not surprising that many a builder focuses on a single area of motorcycle engineering, be it a radical new motor design or a completely new way of doing suspension.  This inventor has more chance of getting their dream into reality, but they still have to sell it.

Speaking from experience, the chief problem with trying to sell advanced engineering concepts to major motorcycle manufacturers is that they can do whatever you did better and cheaper themselves. No matter how brilliant an invention is, Honda or Yamaha and their army of IP lawyers can always find a way to circumvent the newcomer’s patent, or else find ten places where it infringes on theirs. Rather than face crushing litigation the newcomer quietly disappears.

Nembo Motociclette 32 features a completely bespoke, inverted triple, air suspention and some other engineering novelties.
Yup, those are camshafts at the bottom of this inverted triple, air suspension clad street fighter.  Yours if you’ve enough money not to ask how much.

The other main problem is that often these inventions answer questions that the market didn’t ask. Esoteric engine layouts like inverted three cylinder of the Nembo 32, or the pushrod “baby block” V-4 of the Motus found few admirers, at least those admiring enough to open their wallets.

There are rare happy occasions when the inventor of a better motorcycle stands in the sun however. American James Parker succeeded in licensing his patented RADD type center-hub steering front suspension system to Yamaha for the (albeit ill-fated) GTS-1000; and Australian company Orbital licensed its two-stroke direct injection technology to Aprilia, KYMCO and Canada’s own Bombardier.

The utterly marvelous 1994 Yamaha GTS1000 sports Parker's RADD front end design, which separates suspension from steering loads. Loved by the few who own it, it flopped in the marketplace.
The utterly marvelous 1994 Yamaha GTS1000 sports tourer shows off Parker’s RADD front end design, which separates suspension from steering loads. Loved by the few who own it, it flopped in the marketplace and scared Japanese OEMs from alternative suspension for decades.

Ernst Degner, to continue the two-stroke theme, managed to impress the world with his superior disc-valve system so much so that Suzuki helped the man orchestrate a defection from communist East Germany to Japan, with the proviso that he help them develop their own version. The scandal of this illegal technology transfer is legendary, and the subject of a great book.

Just Because

By far the best reason to build a home-made motorcycle is personal satisfaction, and this category of garage builder deserves the last word. Unlike the others, these people are not toiling away hundreds of hours in the hopes of building a commercial empire, winning a prestigious race, or to change the world. They build because it gives them joy.

One of the best places to find these inspirational projects is on Paul Crowe’s website The Kneeslider, where every so often, whenever Paul finds a worthy subject, a home-built project gets presented to the world. Even less often comes one that is mind-blowing in scope and execution.

It looks like it came from the Royal Enfield factory, but it came from the hands of this guy.
It looks like it came from the Royal Enfield factory, but it came from the hands of this guy.

Perhaps the best example of this is Aniket Vardhan’s Royal Enfield Musket. An Indian who came to America with a study visa, he designed and manufactured a V-twin cylinder motor to fit into an Enfield Bullet. When that turned into a more challenging mod than he expected he modified the frame, by which time he was making a new wiring loom and oil system.

The Musket V-twin is not a true one-of-a-kind motorcycle, because it uses a lot of existing Royal Enfield parts and, thanks to the overwhelming reaction to his first bike, he is making batches of them for sale to customers. The key point is that when Vardhan set out to do this, he just wanted an Indian motorcycle with a thumping 1000 cc V-twin, but no one made it.

So he did.

Rough cast aluminum engine casings. Only several hundred hours of machining and finishing left... and that's just the motor.
Rough cast aluminum engine casings. Only several hundred hours of machining and finishing left… and that’s just the motor.

He hand carved wooden patterns for aluminum engine castings, designed and machined his own crankcase, and figured out the firing pattern, built a bespoke electronic ignition system, and so on. The project took years, and untold hours. Many disappointments, disasters, and a lot of money later, he had one bike that was unlike any other. The broad grin on Verdhan’s face, visible in photos and videos, is the sincere proof of why he did it.

The Voices Told Me To 

Every once in a while, a garage build appears that channels the passion people have for motorcycles in a way that big commercial factory efforts cannot. Unlike the committee contrived products presented to the buying public by multinational OEMs, the pure garage build reminds us how deeply personal motorcycling is.

We ride motorcycles because they are personal vehicles. We can and sometimes do share them with a passenger, but they are always considered tacked on after-thoughts, like the passenger accommodations themselves. The design, execution and purpose of a motorcycle is singularly focused on satisfying the rider, the person guiding the handlebars.

The defining sketch that gave birth to the first Motoczysz E1PC
The defining sketch that gave birth to the first Motoczysz E1PC came form one hand, and from one head.  No committee here.

Similarly, the one-of-a-kind homemade motorcycle is a singular vision, one person’s idea for a motorcycle. There almost always are many people involved getting it done, but the project grows from the seeds in one person’s head. When it is done well, it is inspiring. When incomplete or misguided, embarrassing.

Motivations vary for why persons chooses to start so ambitious a project. It makes little sense to design and build a one-of-a-kind motorcycle, given the complexity, enormity of the effort and near impossibility of besting what is already out there. Certainly from a health point of view, both financial and biological, it is always foolhardy.

Canada's own Roger Goldammer is famous for his ground up chopper builds that blend retro board track and sport bike styling. Every detail is bespoke, every curve considered.
Canada’s own Roger Goldammer is famous for his ground up chopper builds that blend retro board track and sport bike styling. Every detail is bespoke, every curve considered, a rarity among reality TV catalogue choppers.

But we continue to do it.

I did it, and will likely do it again. The compulsion to do over what already is, but in your own way, is a siren song impossible to ignore. The custom motorcycle is a labour of love: the love of oneself, the love of one’s own ideas. And as long as there are people in love with their own ideas, there will be garage built motorcycles. Long may it be so.

13 thoughts on “Don’t See a Motorcycle You Like? Build One Yourself!”

  1. One word,Streamlining,since it was banned from motogp racing,it’s as if its the curse of motorcycle design.It’s time to move forward,safer,faster, while using less energy, can all be achieved with streamlining.

  2. Nice article Mr. Uhlarik. I quite enjoyed your scribes in Cycle Canada of past. After spending a half dozen years in NZ and Aussie (and many years before that in Canada), I find it difficult to get back into the building community here in Canada, with which I was once so involved down under. The desire to create and build is such a culture in that part of the world (worked with a bunch of South African’s too who were driven), that I rarely see in Canada. Perhaps it is the spacial distances or the relative lack of general interest in creating ‘cool’ things in which to propel oneself, but the creating community for motorcycles or the like seems weak here. I would like to see and meet like minded individuals such as you describe above to continue my passion. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks again for the great read.

    1. Mike

      Thanks for the compliments and for reading my ramblings. I really do appreciate it.

      I don’t know where in Canada you are so it is difficult to comment on the particular scene in your area. But here are my observations about the Canadian motorcycle culture regarding projects.

      As a born in small town Ontario and bred in Toronto, then leaving for eleven years to come back to Quebec and finally land in the maritimes, I think you have misunderstood Canadian hobby communities. This is a car culture, a hockey culture, and not a motorcycle culture. We don’t even have our American neighbour’s motorcycle counter-culture. Motorcycles in Canada just… are.

      Having lived in five countries and traveled to dozens more, I would say we are very creative and very crafty. It’s just not happening on motorcycles. Canadian bicycle builder culture is vivid, and punches hard above it’s weight on a global stage. Lots of very cool things on which to propel oneself are being made there.

      As for us poor motorcycles, I just started the Amarok and discovered quickly dozens of local garage builders who suddenly wanted to share ideas and beer. And that was in Sherbrooke, Québec. One guy down the pub turned out had made his own Norvin and lovingly restored a half dozen early British singles. My neighbour revealed that he had built kit planes, formula race cars and built his own still.

      Creative Canadian bikers are everywhere, but like most people from here they tend not to talk about themselves too much (I remain an exception :). Look again, I think you be amazed.

      1. “This is a car culture, a hockey culture, and not a motorcycle culture.”
        Also, snowmobiles. But more about riding them than modding, or building them from scratch.

        Surprised to see no mention of Sora in your piece, or in your comment.

        1. Lito Sora is a commercial company that was founded with strategic partners and investors, not a single builder with a dream or invention. That said, they are a good example of a Canadians at least trying to make something happen on two wheels and succeeding (in that they are in series production).

    2. Hi Mike.

      Good observations. And a great article. I tried something different, here in Canada, and it made its way onto KneeSlider. It was the 2300 cc Oldsmobile Quad Four motorcycle I began building some years ago. I got places with it alright, but money became a major worry. Bang your head against a wall, why don’t you. It can happen in the US, Australia, New Zealand, the UK, but not here. Maybe its the climate, or maybe its just that Canadians don’t want the bother. Anyway, I am busy building another bike right now, using a French boxer four cylinder 1300 cc ohc engine. This time I am doing it for the sheer joy of doing it, and the hell with any opinions – from banks, financial advisors, sceptics, scoffers, and so on. If it works, good. If not, I will have tried once again and with a lot more direct experience to back it up. I will continue (to some extent) from where the Brit Laverda-powered ‘Nessie’ left off. An excellent starting point in my view. Prototype 2 is a supersport bike, once again.

      Chris

      1. Chris

        I wasn’t familiar with either your Oldmobile engined project, or that Laverda (which being a long time Laverdista makes me a little ashamed). Thanks for sharing.

        Your project is pretty impressive, especially given the dimensions and weight figures mentioned. I am not, however, surprised that you found no takers on the finance front. I am sorry to say that is not uniquely Canadian. In the US, UK and everywhere else people are not ready to invest in low volume motorcycle companies, not even ones with tremendous publicity or polish.

        But keep going! It is such a worthy endeavor.

        M

        1. Thanks Mike for your comments. I shall indeed keep going. This time around I will not be held back. The GSA ‘red label’ engine is a beautiful little thing. All aluminum, and well balanced. As we come to the end of the internal combustion engine’s development we are left with just a very few left-over air-cooled car engines from the past that fit the motorcyclist’s bill. The GSA engine was installed in a motorcycle, the BFG, but was short lived because it was not (in my view) correctly developed. But here is a gem of a motor waiting for a modern frame and running gear. Wheelbase should be kept short of course. It will need four injector TB’s, lots of porting and cam work, plus a four into two into one tuned length exhaust system, which I already have the pipes for. And it can already rev right out of the box at an easy 8,000 rpm. If I can get it to work it will be less brutal than the Quad Four, and thus more a biker’s kind of sport bike. I shall keep going on the project. Have a look at ‘Nessie’ by the way. The ideas behind it were phenomenal and the two gentlemen who started it were at the cutting edge in their time. The Laverda 180 degree triple was perfect for the job and hurled the beast forward. Great engineering.

          Chris

      2. Thanks for the comments Chris. I landed in NZ 1 month after John Britten passed, and then through good fortune, and a fantastic wife, and great mentor-ship, followed somewhat in his footsteps by building my own 1200 cc turbocharged, intercooled, injected liquid cooled 90 degree V-Twin for a snowmobile (from Alberta…Mountains calling!). 2000 hours, pattern making, machining, designing and engineering resulted in a couple of fantastic bangs of combustion. Too bad the last one was fatal. Never got back to it, but still have all the parts. Family is now in the way, but the mind is still running at 110%.

        I have held all of the #7, 9, and 10 Britten’s in my hands before completion, and when building my engine I talked to Lenco who built the original Britten engine in the pictured bike at the beginning of the article. Very cool, but decided to build my own. Met the guy who designed the first 3 Jag XJ220 engines (V12, V8, TTV6), with all the blown up bits in his shop (as well as a few turbo NSX engines for testing) to prove it. All that exposure took me to designing a governor controlled VVT system for a Ducati 2V/4V twin based upon the 900 series engines. No production history due to many factors…Had a hoot, but family has taken precedent.

        Now the mind (and my SolidWorks is working) on a Tularis type bike based on a 916 chassis and a Rotax 800 twin, that is designed for 375lbs and 165hp. Should be a giggle, but have a bit more work yet. Someday…

        Cheers,

        Mike

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