BMW unveils updated S1000 RR at Intermot

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More power. Less weight. Better handling.

Those are the sort of claims BMW is making for their updated S1000 RR, unveiled today at the Intermot show in Germany. They’ve made a host of upgrades to their flagship superbike, and if their claims are correct, the finished product should far surpass the old machine.

Starting with the motor: BMW re-engineered the cylinder head (new duct geometry), added a new intake camshaft and lighter intake valves, a larger airbox, and also added a new, lighter exhaust. That exhaust is likely responsible for much of the bike’s weight loss; it’s down 4 kg, and the exhaust alone is 3 kg lighter.

All the engine tweaks are supposed to bring output up to 199 hp at 13,500 rpm and 83 ft-lb of torque at 10,500 rpm. Torque output is supposed to be increased over 5,000 rpm, making for a more linear curve.

BMW updated the electronics and suspension, along with the motor.
BMW updated the electronics and suspension, along with the motor.

BMW has also revised the S1000 RR’s electronic riding modes. Rain, Sport and Race riding modes come standard. There’s also an optional Pro mode, along with a Slick mode and User mode, which can be tailored to individual riders’ tastes.

Pro mode includes Launch Control for faster starts and a pit lane speed limiter that keeps your bike at a constant speed for trips through the pits.

There are several other electronic upgrades available as ex-works options. Buyers can opt for Dynamic Damping Control, an updated version of the electronic suspension management system that was featured on the old HP4 superbike (an upscale version of the previous-gen S1000 RR). Other options include HP Gear Shift Assist Pro for faster clutchless upshifting and downshifting, and electronic speed control.

There are several interesting ex-works upgrades available for the S1000 RR. No word yet on an updated HP4.
There are several interesting ex-works upgrades available for the S1000 RR. No word yet on an updated HP4.

Race ABS is standard on the new Beemer, as well as DTC traction control. The chassis has been re-designed to improve handling, and shave some weight. The suspension’s springs are fully adjustable with “optimised negative spring travel for more banking clearance and greater agility.” We’re guessing an engineer wrote that …

In the looks department, the S1000 RR also gets restyled bodywork, which makes for “an even more dynamic design language.” We’re guessing a marketeer wrote that …

We don’t have an arrival date for the S1000 RR, or Canadian pricing, but we’re guessing we’ll start seeing them in our showrooms sometime in the new year, and Jordan Szoke and half the CSBK grid will be flogging one next summer.


GALLERY

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