The 2014 Suzuki V-Strom 1000: 45 photos and all the details!

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Suzuki's V-Strom 1000 looks pretty similar to the concept bike they were previewing on the show circuit last fall.
Suzuki’s V-Strom 1000 looks pretty similar to the concept bike they were previewing on the show circuit last fall.

Suzuki has released new information about their updated V-Strom 1000 on their mini-site dedicated to the bike. Here are some of the adventure bike’s highlights – it looks like it could be an important step forward for Suzuki.

The motor has been big-bored to 1037 cc, thanks to a 2 mm increase in bore size.
The motor has been big-bored to 1037 cc, thanks to a 2 mm increase in bore size.

For instance, this bike has Suzuki’s first traction control on a motorcycle. The system has two modes of sensitivity – one kicks in as soon as it detects any rear wheel slip, the other mode allows for a little more leeway. And, just in case you want to actually take this adventure bike into the gravel, you can turn the system off. There’s also a freeze sensor that lights up in the dash when the temperature drops below 3° C.

It seems ABS is standard on the new V-Strom 1000, along with 310 mm brake discs up front with four-piston monobloc calipers, and a 295 mm disc with single-piston caliper in back. Suzuki doesn’t say whether or not the ABS can be switched off, though.

The motor has also seen significant changes. Suzuki upped the bore 2 mm, boosting displacement to 1037 cc. Suzuki re-designed the pistons, cylinders, cylinder heads, crankshaft, con-rods, radiator and clutch to take advantage of the motor tweaks. The clutch also has the SCAS Suzuki Clutch Assistance System to act as a slipper clutch, and make shifting easier. The bike has a totally redesigned six-speed transmission.

There’s a two-into-one exhaust system on the new bike, with a butterfly valve tuning system that adjusts exhaust pressure to match running conditions. Suzuki claims this allows for more torque at low revs. There’s plenty of other trick electronica on the bike as well, aimed at making more power with less fuel and reduce mechanical loss (for instance, the rectifier disconnects the magneto when it is not charging the battery).

Suzuki took care to mention they were the first company to come up with the "adventure beak" styling.
Suzuki took care to mention they were the first company to come up with the “adventure beak” styling.

The bike has the same styling seen on most modern ADV bikes. There’s optional three-piece OEM luggage available (29 litres in left pannier, 26 litres in right pannier, top box and pannier keys matched to ignition).  The windshield is adjustable to three heights and three angles. On their mini-site, Suzuki went out of their way to point out this machine isn’t copying BMW styling; the beaked bodywork was actually a trend started by Suzuki with their DR750 back in 1988.

Front and rear wheels are 19-inch and 17-inch respectively, made of cast aluminum. Front forks are 43 mm units, and fully adjustable, while the rear shock has dial adjustability. The aluminum wheels are not as robust as spoked wheels and aren’t as suitable for real off-road work, but they help keep weight down – this bike is eight kg lighter than the previous V-Strom 1000.

Suzuki's even included traction control on the new Strom.
Suzuki’s even included traction control on the new Strom.

The new machine has an 1155 mm wheelbase; that’s longer than the previous V-Strom 1000. The distance between the front axle and swingarm pivot is shorter, while the swingarm itself is longer – that’s supposed to help with straight line ability and cornering agility.

Along with the luggage, other accessories available include fog lamps, handguards, low seat, high seat, crash bars, engine cowling, tankbag, centrestand, heated grips, and heated grips.

The V-Strom 1000 is expected to be officially unveiled at the 2013 AIM Expo in Orlando next month.


GALLERY

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4 COMMENTS

    • This is a different sort of ugly than the Versys 1000, which is just really awkward looking. I could live without the beak, and the whole thing certainly looks a little busy. The Euro adventure bikes are also awkward looking, but seem to hold together better as a whole.

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