Kibo K150 is designed to give power to the people

Do you want a motorcycle with a lot of carrying capacity, but you’ve got a low budget? The Kibo K150 might do the trick, as long as you’re in Kenya.

Although it was designed in Amsterdam, the Kibo K150 was built with one goal in mind: to bring affordable transportation to Africans. A Dutch economist organized the manufacturer in order to provide a motorcycle that was suited to the needs faced by couriers, moto-taxis, aid organizations, medical personnel, and other people needing a bike that could carry a lot of weight.

Kibo’s new bike will be assembled in Kenya from parts sourced outside the country; we’re guessing that means the engine is one of the generic Chinese clones of older air-cooled Honda designs (it’s a counter-balanced single, SOHC). That little motor will be working overtime, as the bike is rated for a 250 kg carrying capacity, bringing its load-bearing capability in line with much larger motorcycles. The front wheel has a 21-inch rim, the rear has an 18-inch rim.

A workhorse for the 21st century.

The pricing for the K150 works out to roughly $4,500 Canadian, but we’re highly unlikely to ever see one here for sale, thanks to emissions rules.

It is, however, interesting to speculate as to how well the Kibo K150 would do as a budget overseas adventure bike. In recent years, there has been a growing number of ADV riders turning towards small-capacity machines like the Honda CT110 postie bike, the CG125, and other smaller bikes that are easier to keep running in developing countries, where they form much of the local transportation system. These bikes are also a lot more affordable than full-size adventure bikes.

Our guess is, it won’t be long until we see a trans-African run on a K150, with the ride report showing up on ADVRider.com. Or at least, we’ll see lots of pictures of them in use by locals, carrying everything from medical supplies to baskets of chickens.

5 thoughts on “Kibo K150 is designed to give power to the people”

  1. “What’s it matter? We’re never going to see this bike in Canada. This article is just another in a long series of similar stuff here. I keep hoping for better but this is getting a little monotonous…”

    +1

  2. They spelled the name wrong –

    “In North America, a widespread term for outhouse is “kybo”. This appears to have originated from camps which used Kybo brand coffee cans to hold lye or lime which was sprinkled down the hole to reduce odor. “Keep Your Bowels Open” may be a backronym.”

  3. Where’s the stupid mandatory beak? How can you have an “Adventure” on that? It should be 5 feet wide with large aluminum aircraft crates, multiple crash bars, and the rider should be dressed for life on Pluto.

    1. What’s it matter? We’re never going to see this bike in Canada. This article is just another in a long series of similar stuff here. I keep hoping for better but this is getting a little monotonous…

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