Video: Check out the 2013 Yamaha FJR1300AS

Look at those front forks - the suspension is one of the main differences between the FJR1300A and this FJR1300AS. Too bad it's not available in Canada yet.
Look at those front forks – the suspension is one of the main differences between the FJR1300A and this FJR1300AS. Too bad it’s not available in Canada yet.

Yamaha’s supposed to announce their new “Dark Side of Japan” model after today’s dealer meetings, but here’s a look at another bike that has already been shown off.

Last fall, Bondo got to ride the new Yamaha FJR1300, and told us all about it, but he only had a chance to ride the A model. As he said at the time, the AS model was available in Europe, but the technology hasn’t made its way to our North American models yet.

Here’s a look at the FJR1300AS, with electronic clutchless shifting – in fact, the tranny even automatically shifts straight to first when you come to a stop, and you can shift gears with your thumb instead of your left foot, if you want. There’s new electronically adjustable suspension, with upside down forks.

It also benefits from many of the upgrades the A model saw, like improved fly-by-wire throttle.

3 thoughts on “Video: Check out the 2013 Yamaha FJR1300AS”

  1. YES, I “second & third” that for me & my wife — we each ride bikes … we would love to see YAMAHA bring back the “AS” (electronic clutch) model again to Canada — even just for one year. We would buy 2 of them!! This is the 2nd generation of this technology and I expect reliable (I heard there were issues with the 1st). I wonder how people could notify YAMAHA, and if enough did, perhaps they would bring some in.

  2. Hey Yamaha, I’ve ridden my 04 FJR 100,000 miles. We’re going to the Arctic Circle together in 3 weeks for what likely is it’s last major trip. I’ve been shopping to replace it and I love the 2013. But I want the AS. Bring it.

  3. Why not just use a tubular handlebar that can be replaced with one that fits the rider instead of these cast handlebars that never quite fit the rider perfectly?

    Most riders are not exactly average in every dimension, and have personal preferences as to how we hold our hands and arms while riding. Tubular handlebars may be “old fashioned” but they allow for an owner to get the handlebars exactly where they want them. Moving to clunky cast bars that only have a few positions is a regressive step in ergonomics.

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