KLR Adventure Tourer – 2

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Words: Rob Harris. Pictures: Rob Harris, unless otherwise specified.

In the grand tradition of magazine projects it’s taken a little longer to get this thing going then I had anticipated (see part 1).

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I thought I’d planned it well, doing a mass of research on the web about what mods KLR users recommend, finding all the possible accessories available and then whittling it down to a list of the most important, while trying to keep it under the allotted $3,000 budget to boot. All this wasn’t actually that hard (just time consuming) and I even managed to strike a deal with Les Clarke at Dual Sport Plus to provide all the parts. It seemed like all was hunky dory. But then came a particularly hard and intensive few months at CMG with the launch of our new daily news site. We also had some delays getting the parts we needed from Dual Sport Plus, so the project that was supposed to start in January but didn’t start until May. Sigh. Well, the hurdles have now been hurdled, most of the parts have been garnered and I’m now into the fitting and appraising process. I’ve decided to split the process up into a few sections, starting with the motor mods, which I’ll go over here, stating what we’re doing and how much it costs. Hopefully by the end of it we’ll have a pretty good adventure tourer and all within our budget. Then we get to ride the damn thing!


THE ENGINE MODS The Plan

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The first of two shipments from Dual Sport Plus was like a big box of Xmas pressies. Lots of bits to work with!

For all the readers out there that are not home mechanics or students of mechanical engineering I thought it might be useful to open each update with a little bit of theory as to why I’m modifying what I’m modifying.

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Despite what the picture may suggest, the KLR could definitely benefit from a little more zip.
photo: Judith Crichton

Please note that I’m not going to go into a blow-by-blow account of fitting these parts, as this info is already covered elsewhere online (links provided), but I will highlight any issues I find along the way. What I want to achieve with the motor of the KLR is to try and boost performance without spending an arm and a leg (gotta watch that budget) or indeed sacrificing fuel economy too much in the process. An adventure tourer is for touring, after all, and there’s no point in making a motor that just sucks fuel. Okay, so what are the best performance mods and why? Hours of scanning the web tell me there is room to give a slight power boost and improved throttle response (the KLR motor is far from snappy) and all within a small budget to boot.

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Probably the best known weak point of the KLR 650 is the Doohickey. Beefy aftermarket version shown left.

Of course, you can spend a fortune if you want with hotter cams, big bore kits and replacement carbs, but then you shouldn’t have bought a KLR in the first place. There’s always a point when it makes much more sense to spend more money on a more powerful bike, than try and make one out of one that just isn’t. You can’t make ice cream out of shit, you know. Well, unless you want shit ice-cream. I also want to fix any inherent weak points, and with the KLR motor that means the balance shaft adjuster, AKA the Doohickey. I’m also fitting a low-profile magnetic drain plug, as the original sits above the skid plate and so can be clipped if you graze a rock (seen it happen, and the resulting cracked case—very messy). The magnetic bit will catch any metal shavings floating around in the motor (hopefully not too many).


The Mods A) Air box mod & filter. Price = Mod is free (if you have the drill bits) and air filter costs $20 (estimate)

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Bit of a gamble this one, but I opted to cut some holes in the top of the airbox (pre left and post right) to let it get more air into the motor.

The idea of my chosen mods is to get more air and fuel into the motor. Now that sounds like a recipe for poor fuel economy, but since all motorcycles have to work within some pretty strict noise and emission regulations they tend to suffer from restricted airflows and overly lean mixtures, thus reducing performance.

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The whole box – by cutting holes in the very top it won’t make the bike any more susceptible to water ingress.

I decided to do this by drilling some extra holes in the airbox, and fitting a freer-flowing filter than stock. One mod I saw on the web was to cut out an ‘L’ shape in the top of their KLR airbox to let it breathe more. It looked like a bit of work so I decided to just drill out several circles instead using 1 1/4″ and 1 3/4″ drills. It wasn’t exactly symmetrical but it’s hidden under the seat so beauty isn’t a requirement and I left a 1/4″ gap (ish) between the holes, which I think should retain some strength too. Oh, and I’m also going to remove the wire mesh found between the filter and the intake. Someone had recommended it and I don’t see why it’s needed, so why not? Some people may think that this mod means the bike is more vulnerable to water intake if dunked in water, but the holes are in the top of the box and above the regular snorkel, so if it got that deep, water will already have got in.

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I also have a parts bike that comes with a Cobra pipe. Taken apart it doesn’t look like it’ll be the quietest of pipes.

No, I think the main downside will be the ingress of dust, requiring more regular filter cleanings. I’m also expecting more intake noise but if it’s bad I do have a spare parts KLR so I can always convert it back to stock. The air filter is actually on back order with Dual Sport Plus, but I’ll add an update on that if required. So far I’m undecided about the exhaust pipe. An aftermarket unit offers better flow and reduced weight (the standard pipe appears to be filled with lead), but the drawbacks are increased noise and high cost. I’ll get back to you on this, but any advice on a pipe that might fit that criterion is much welcomed (comments below please). I do have a Cobra aftermarket pipe from a parts bike I own, so I may try that — and it’s free. B) Dynojet Carb Kit. Price = $53.95

jet_kit.jpgThe Dynojet kit comes with a drill to enlarge the slider hole (left – 6 o’clock) as well as a new needle (right) with grooved top for adjustment.

But more air isn’t much good if you can’t match it with some extra fuel, and a quick and relatively cheap way to do that is to install a carburettor jet kit. This will not only increase flow rate, but also improve response at lower throttle openings (emissions regulations tend to adversely affect the low throttle openings).

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Pilot jets was blocked but you can see through it now.

The Dynojet kit comes with the jets to do a stage 1 or 2 conversion. Stage 1 is for pretty well stock machines, whereas Stage 2 is for bikes with modded airboxes. Both are suitable for use with an aftermarket pipe. The procedure seems to be the same for both stages, though needle height and main jet size are dependent on the which stage you perform (higher and bigger for stage 2 respectively). You must be careful to select the proper drill bit from the kit as there are two supplied, one to drill out the mixture screw plug, the other to drill out the slide lift hole; don’t mix them up, or as I found out, read the instructions carefully. The fuel mixture screw is set at about 1 3/4 turns at the factory, but this kit recommends 3 1/2 turns out (richer). That seems like a lot, but I will readjust if needed once the bike is running. I should mention my bike wouldn’t idle without the choke applied before I began working on it. It turned out that it had a blocked pilot jet so I threaded a piece of copper wire (extracted from an electrical cable and used because it’s soft and won’t damage the jet) through the jet to clean it.

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Original filter may have contributed to poor running …

Of course, it may not have helped that the air filter was pretty gummed up too! The standard main jet is a 148 (the higher the number the more fuel it passes) but the kit recommends anything from a 136 to 150 depending on the stage chosen and exhaust fitted. I find this a bit odd as you’d expect it to want to deliver more fuel and therefore go from 150 and up, though this could be due to differences in numbering between Dynojet and Kawasaki. Since I did the airbox mod I’ll try 150 and go down from there if needed. The final mod is to replace the non-grooved stock jet needle (which restricts the flow out of the main jet progressively with throttle application – full throttle meaning no restriction) with the new one that has five circlip grooves in the top. The location of the circlip on the needle determines the needle’s height (a higher needle offers less restriction to the fuel from the main jet), the exact position depending on which stage you’re opting for.

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Carbs always look complicated in diagram view, but the Dynojet tune up is easy.

With all the mods carried out to stage 2 specs, the carb was reassembled and ready for on-road testing (if anything it’ll likely be on the rich side which is better than lean as that can cause engine damage). All in all, with the carb off, it’s about an hour’s job. By the way, you can apparently get a very quick and easy improvement in carburation by adding a 0.020″ shim under the standard needle and turning out the fuel mixture screw a bit. More info: Here’s the link to a guy that started doing much what I have here and dyno’d all the changes along the way: www.patmanracing.com/klrdyno.htm Since my mods are very similar to his then I should see a healthy boost in lower rpms (which is kinda where I’d like it most) though with a slight drop at the top. He also took out the snorkel from the airbox, which I may try if I want to lean it out a tad. C) Doohickey/balance shaft adjuster upgrade kit (includes Doohickey, coil springs, rotor holder, gaskets, puller, bolt). Price = $124.99, plus $13.99 for the torsion spring (optional).

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The original Doohickey can be seen on the left (complete with gouges from overtightening). Replacement can be seen right (very nice).

As with any large capacity single cylinder machine unless you have a balancer system in place to counter the up and down fling of the piston you’re going to have a pretty vibratory ride (ever ride a KTM 640???).

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Not only was it gouged but it was bent too. I was lucky it hadn’t broken!

The KLR uses two balancer shafts connected by a chain that is kept taught by an eccentrically mounted adjuster mechanism (aka Doohickey). Every now and then you need to loosen the adjuster to allow a spring to take up the chain slack, where upon you retighten the adjuster and Bob’s you auntie’s live-in lover! Trouble is the standard Doohickey is prone to breaking from over tightening of the adjuster (or just bad luck) and the spring can fail too. This can lead to the chain jumping and seizing up the motor. I even had a friend suffer a complete ignition failure when a part of his broken Doohickey took out his ignition pickup coil.

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The Doohickey kit comes with everything you need to make the changes.

Thankfully there are a couple of aftermarket upgrades that are significantly stronger and can even be bought as a kit that comes with optional torsion spring, rotor holding tool, rotor puller and replacement rotor bolt (Kawasaki recommends replacement every time) and gaskets — which is what Dual Sport Plus sent me. Now interestingly there seems to be a big hooharhar in the KLR community over which Doohickey to buy. It used to be that it was just made by Eagle Mike but it appears that another company (Studebaker) have jumped in on the Doohickey train and there is now much furore over whether the Studebaker unit is any good. There certainly seems to be no physical difference other than the Eagle Mfgr is harder, but whether it is enough to cause a problem, who knows? All I know is that I was sent a Studebaker version, which looks a damn sight better than the original, so I’m fitting it. The job is pretty straight forward, though you’ll need a good long extension bar to get enough torque to get the rotor holding bolt out. I wouldn’t bother trying to do it without the complete kit, unless you have a friend with one that you can borrow, as it’s really a one off job.

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The torsion spring was a bit challenging to fit, but the new part looks so much better. Shame that it’ll be hidden by the case.

With the covers (2) and rotor removed, the Doohickey was easily accessible. The original spring was still in one piece (they are reported to break easily) but the Doohickey was gouged and actually bent from over tightening in the past – just see the pics to see the differences between the original and its replacement!

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The rotor holding tool is a must!

To fit the torsion spring you need to drill a hole (bit provided) in the secondary cover to anchor one end of the spring, while the hook end attaches into the slot of the Doohickey itself. As with any spring this is a bit tricky but with the help of needle nosed pliers and a few attempts the job was done. Looks good too! All in all, with a good workshop and the right tools you should be able to do the job in a couple of hours. More info: Doohickey video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=26oSOrvv_e8 Doohickey text and pics: www.klr650.marknet.us/doohickey.html Installing a torsion spring: http://leftcoastklrs.com/Install_a_torsion_spring.htm D) Low profile magnetic drain plug. Price = $ 13.49

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Low profile drain plug is shown insert. Main pic shows view through the bashplate – the original plug (not shown) sticks out and is vulnerable to being hit.

Do I really need to go into this? Not really, remove old, fit new. Job done.


The Damage I’m really looking forward to seeing how the performance mods liven up the motor, with all done relatively easily and at reasonable expense. To date my cost is $226.42, though that doesn’t include an exhaust pipe (if I decide to go there) and an estimate for the air filter. $2,773.58 left to spend! I’ll try and make the next update a little sooner. First I have to work out which is the next area to be updated. Thanks to .. Dual Sport Plus for supplying us with all the bits we needed to do the engine mods!

0 thoughts on “KLR Adventure Tourer – 2”

  1. LMFAO!!!!

    No I don’t know him…..but unfortunatly I got this email saying there was another post, and I thought I had deleated this site!!!
    Goes to show….no new posts after learning whats what…lol

    I just wish you would have done some research before starting and done it right for everyone’s sake. Ditto on the Skeeto remarks on condition of bike but I thought I’d let that slide……something for nothing rings all too loudly on your behalf……shame, a real shame you could have had a winning thing going here for sure. With just a few hours of research before taking the first handout you were offered….Oh Well….?

    see ya!

  2. Yo Editor ‘arris!

    Any updates on the actual KLR upgrades? I have been following the articles and hoping to get a KLR in the near future, so I am keen to see whats what with the mods.

    With the risk of waking up Willys or Skeefool, I look forward to another installment!

  3. Blasphemy!!,What kind of fly by night out fit are you running?Once I got up to speed,on this article,Im not so sure about your questionable antics,you try to pass this off to unsuspecting readers,and you use Eagle Mikes Instructions,to install a inferior copy of his quality part,and try to pass it off as good?I just lost all respect of your project,and your shoddy website.Have you any idea how much work EM put into developing a superior doohicky,to make available to KLR owners?and you try to pass off bullshit to the readers?Dude,your sad.

  4. I commend your efforts,Ive recycled several bikes in my time,my last project bike bought for 100$,I sold for 950$ it was a twin shock Honda Elsonore 125 dirt bike,anyway,by the looks of the airbox you drilled out,that bike is in very rough condition,how can you justify putting all those new parts on such a worn down bike?you should do a frame off resto and then try to polish it up,it just seems like a waste of your sponsors new parts,to me.

  5. Wow! Willys got up on the wrong side of the continent!

    Clarifications on a few things:
    1. Eagle Mike’s was the second ‘doo’ to be made, the first was by David ‘Jake’ Jakeman. KLR old timers will recall, Jake’s was the shiznit and Mike’s was the inferior. Jake made his in his spare time and got to the point he hated it, but kept making them until Mike finally had his ready. Jake left Mike the lone mfg on his passing a few years back, where Stude picked up. With that said, I put 40k miles on a ’97 without ever changing the ‘doo’, still going in another’s hands (I upgraded to a dr650). My method was to actually wait until you heard the slack in the chain (if you pay attention to your bike you really can tell when it needs tensioning long before it grenades), with the engine running – loose the bolt a bit until the noise stops – then snug, don’t crank the bolt down (chains have high and low or loose and tight spots, reason for adjustment while running). Worked out to be about every 5000 miles, but to save time ans effort I adjusted with oil changes.

    2. The KLRs with the most factory updates are the ones that have been made in Taiwan since like 2000, Chinese junk, well ok. I think it’s been said that the older Japanese KLRs are better, dunno?!?

    3. Avoid the Cobra muffler like the plague…the aluminum housing will get beat to death by the heavy steel innards. If you do use it, replace the aluminum with steel exhaust pipe, at least then the bike won’t sound like a volkswagen. ‘tweet’

    4. See if you can find a KLX front end, one of the best KLR mods.

    5. If we could get the Yamaha 660 Tenere in North America, the $1500 KLR would disappear – they couldn’t give KLRs away.

    Editor, Keep on doing the budget mods you got, anything is better than stock. My suggestion is akin to the post about parking on the tracks, just give it to the Crusty Demons guys, as in their film #8.

  6. Welcome to the wonderful world of Willys and the rest of the gang at klr650.net. There’s a reason I don’t hang out there anymore!!!

    Good write up. I’m eager to see the rest of the build and your progress.

  7. I have a Studebaker doohickey from DSP in my 2009 KLR as well with 45,000km on it. No problems. It runs and sounds just fine. 🙂

  8. At this point, I’d be tempted to modify the KLR by parking it on a railway crossing and filming the results. Then I’d pick up an old GS Suzuki and go to another well-known website where they don’t treat you like a moron when you try to update your ride. KLR-land must be a sad, lonely place.

  9. Unfortunately for all of you,we cannot relive the 60’s or the 70’s and the 80’s. The days of mods on bikes are nearly over. Watch and learn from this website. Pipe swaps anyone? Big Brother is here, with fines and penalties for you! Corporation/Governmental partnerships rule. With fuel injection, catalytic converters, there are few mods allowed. Because of all this, the era of electric bikes is here! Or e bikes.

  10. I have had the studabaker doohickey in my KLR for 5 years and 30000k no issues. Bike runs like new. Just my 2cents. 🙂

  11. Hey Willys … throw out everything you own that is made in China. I’m pretty sure that will mean your computer too … which might allow everyone to go back to enjoying one man’s struggle with his mighty KLR … when he really should have bought a DR 650 :grin

    I think the KLR is made in Japan. Many used to feel the same about Japanese products as they now feel about Chinese products. If you are really concerned about the North American economy, I suggest you do the right thing and ditch your KLR and go buy a Harley. Then you will have plenty to farkle with … :zzz

  12. Hmmmm….?
    When you or the shop you were given your parts from has seen as many KLRs as I have and worked on them in a timely manner, not months to do a day’s work at most, then I will take what you or they say with any weight. You just haven’t read up enough or seen any other bike’s but your own and did you watch how and learn why etc it was done? I don’t know? But hey, again…it’s your bike and it’s your pocket the repairs will come from unless you get another or same company to repair it for you free of charge.
    No..sorry I didn’t get up on the wrong side of the bed…I just know what is what when it comes to this bike. Nothing more.
    As for documented proof of failures, there is some for the torsion spring that is a copy. The DOO, I’m not sure of. But I do know how it fits on the shaft and what it’s made from compared to the widely known best on the market. Which has had zero failures from the day it started production, many many years ago.
    This whole idea of buying a part from the original designer and shipping it overseas to have it copied is what is destoying our economy as well as the one below the border. Or don’t you agree on that either? All you have done is feed an off shore company more money by buying this slightly less expensive part just to save a few bucks.
    Is it really worth it? Sooner or later nothing will be made, designed in this country or below the border because of this problem.
    I’m sure the retailer doesn’t care, they I expect, just want to get as much as they can before the bottom drops out.

    Everyone who owns a KLR needs to become a member, it’s free, to either of the sites I have mentioned and learn for themselves what is what. Then ask themselves what is best for their bikes. Not blindly follow a magazine’s freebie supplied opinions without the full scoop on what it is they are installing while acting like sheep so to speak. Everyone was a noob at one point, at least get as much good information as humanly possible when working on or farkling their bikes.
    I’m sure you will agree on that….?
    OK, I’m done….enjoy your ride, I hope it keeps going for many years to come.

  13. Thanks Chris!

    I’m very much against loud pipes too and if the parts pipe is too loud then it won’t be used. As for the airbox mods, yes, there’s a spare if it doesn’t do what I want, but I’m keen to see how it goes.

    Cheers, Rob

  14. Boy, someone got up on the wrong side of the bed…:) Mr Harris, I personally enjoyed your article and look forward to seeing the final result. Do I think you airbox mod was a good one? No, but why not give it a go and see if it works – that’s how you learn – besides you have a spare. I also dislike loud pipes, but you addressed that concern in the article and someone even offered help/ideas in the comment section. Trying things out is part of the fun with this type of project. The components sent all look to be of quality (a subjective term) and as you said the doohickey you have looks much better than stock. For the amount of money we are talking about here I don’t think cost was a major concern…

  15. I’m sorry, you don’t seem to be reading what I’ve said. If you can back up your argument with some documentation of failures then you have an argument. Failing that, you just have a rant.

  16. ……Why would they sell you a chinese copy of Eagle Mike’s DOO that is known even to you to be a lesser quality part just to save what…? A buck or two on that piece? Is the economy that bad you/they need to save that much on a lesser quallity piece that is an internal important known to be an engine destroying problem, then you/they know there is a better part available for a few $ more? I don’t think so personally. I have seen this piece installed on to the idle arm shaft and it is a better stronger piece than the original but it doesn’t fit on the shaft as well or as tight as either the stock DOO or Eagle Mike’s DOO. This allowes the idler to move while the engine is in operation slowly wearing away either the softer DOO or the shaft it rides on. Both not an ideal situation…no?
    Why would they give you a collection of parts from multiple vendors when a complete kit is available from the original designer, manufacturer of said parts? To save them and you a few dollars…..no other reason…IMHO…and that is all it is, but it is backed up by many many of the well known in the KLR world to be a product that is inferior. As I stated before….I couldn’t care less if it were something that didn’t compermize safety or the reliability of the engine or yourself. If that part failed in any way the possibility of your engine to sieze and lock up your rear wheel is almost guarranteed. To promote the use of such inferior parts in a published article is irrisponsible as many people will read it and not know any better and possibly use these parts and possibly have catistrophic results. You do know about the issues here as you did say that there was some issues revolving around the DOO, but you didn’t dig very deep to find out how dangerous it could be along with how well these parts are made in comparisn to the original Eagle Mike DOO.
    I will agree that I personally haven’t seen a copybreak yet but the fit and finish is noticeably worse than the DOO which is knowm to be the best, Eagle Mike’s.Again, if you choose to use chinese copies of none possibly dangerous items such as racks, crash bars, knuckle protection(barkbusters), lights,whatever…no problem, knock your socks off…..I have too. These parts won’t cause me to crash or explode my expensive engine when they fail, if they fail.
    You also refered to a KLX needle clip and collar. This is known to be the best way to deal with your carb issues over the product you have been given. It’s a better shaped needle with the same 5 positions for the clip to be placed. You would also not need to use such a large main jet when using the KLX needle, but usually a smaller one will be best. All depending upon what else has been done to your engine.
    The holes you cut into the top of your air cleaner are your choise I take it…? Or were you told what size to use or to cut the huge “L” ? I’m glad you didn’t go and completely ruin your airbox with that. Most people who do some reading on the subject of carb mods have learned that if you use a 1″ drill bit and make the same 4 holes, they can reverse all of this bu putting 1″ plugs from electrical boxes to fill the holes. So instead of having to buy another airbox you simply plug the holes up using the plugs. This is also a way to regulate the amount of air being allowed to flow into your engine.
    As for your air cleaner…? It is widely known that the UNI is by far the best one on the market for our engines. I hope that is your choise too…? But that too is a personal choise buit an very inexpensive one at the moment….$20 or close to it.
    The slider hole at 1/8″ will cause a fluttering at higher RPMs resulting in an uneven throttle responce. 7/64ths is the correct size. It has been proven to be the best. The dyno results you used…? You didn’t acknowledge the person who did all of those runs to determine way back before it was known they’re were better products to use. Patman combined with Cary was on the leading edge of the performance mods for our bikes until Cary’s death a few years ago. Since then there has been many upgrades to his findings that you would have read of if you were on one of the two main forumns for KLRs. Both come up when you search KLR forums…simple and easy to find. KLR650.net and KLRWorld.com. Both excellent research bases to get all your needed info on KLRs at length.

    So……itg is your bike and I don’t care what you put in it, but you have some resonsibility when reporting for a very popular mag as yours to give the best info possible to your readers…IMHO. Not just use the free stuff not knowing possibly the bad results from using those chinese)or where ever they are produced) parts. Especially when you know there is a much better original product out there for the KLR community to use.
    IMHO….you can’t use the I didn’t know any better responce….you should have even if you didn’t…..it’s all easy to research and find this information.

    What else would you like to know?

    I’m curious why they didn’t give you the copy of the torsion spring? Or the copy of the tool to hold the rotor, or did they I think I saw both Eagle Mike’s tool for the rotor and the knock-oof tool, but I could be mistaken. As for the leftcoast website…Eagle Mike is the admistrator of that site and if I am not mistaken it is his site….I don’t use it that much unless I too am researching something I don’t know or am unsure of.

    As for the rest of your build….I’m curious to where else you are going with it and what you will be choosing to use to complete it.
    Beware of the rotor copies, another safety part I think….? But an area that needs attention.

    OH…sorry I have a bad memory…the choise of exhausts…? Use your stock can and do the low buck exhaust mod using a 1/8″ drill bit. It leaves the guts in the can and only takes out the well known tweety baffle and allows better flow and still remains quiet. Much quieter than that straight through can you have shown on your build. Nothing like pissing off the locals when riding by etc uing a very loud exhaust. This too is a well known issue. Laws are being drawn up to ban regulate loud bikes from many communities in Ontario and many other locations in North America. So again to promote the use of a loud can isn’t in the best interest of the sport of dual sport or adventure riding…IMHO…is it? Again…your article not mine.

    Again sorry to rant or express my feelings or knowledge if it differs from your own or others.

    Willys

  17. Wow, okay, I think you’ve given a good example of the level of feelings that are flowing in this debate! You’re not totally accurate with you assumptions though so let me go over your points here.

    [quote]Hmmmm….?
    You go and buy, get given a substandard internal engine part and say it’s as good as the original developer and manufacturer of the AKA DOO-hickey, Eagle Mike who you do acknowledge as who he is the person who designed and perfected this part, but only to buy the cheaper product and then steal his instuctions to install the torsion spring??? WTF???[/quote]

    Well I was given the piece from Dual Sport Plus. I made of list of parts that I needed (including the Doohicky) and they sent me the Studebaker. First I knew of the hooharhar around this was when I went to look for instructions on fitting the torsion spring (which was made by Leftcoastklrs.com, not Studebaker, though I’m not sure if you approve of them or not). As recommended by Leftcoastklrs I went to their website and followed their instructions, which I believe is not theft.

    [quote]If I were to install a lesser strength item inside my engine and advertise it as good as needed when I knew it was a copy of the original made off shore to only save money…..a few dollars at that….what a shame when you have such a large audience watching this article with such interest. Yes I can see that you are trying to do this on the shoestring budget and have no issue using chinese crap on the outside of the engine such as crash bars, racks etc, but internal engine parts???[/quote]

    From what I can find on the web the Studebaker does seem to be hardened to a lesser degree than the Eagle Mfg but you make the assumption that that is insufficient. I could not find any reports to back that claim and if you have, please forward them. The question as to whether a part is sufficient or not is a tough one but all I stated was that it looked a lot better than the original bent item that i took off and so as far as I could ascertain it was worth fitting. I make no claims as to the quality or effectiveness of the product other than I got it, it seems to be good and I fitted it.

    [quote] Come on….Just to save a few bucks? You do know of the issue at hand here as you have skirted it with your comments in your article. Then you use Eagle Mike’s instructions to install the copies of his products!!! WTF? Didn’t they send you any instructions with the copies? I guess to save more money…?[/quote]

    I’m not sure where you’re getting this argument from. I merely have links to websites that i found useful to fit stuff. i don’t think they are even affiliated with Eagle Mfg.

    [quote] If they are trying to save money not sending instructions, what does that say about the quality of that internal engine part? It screams CRAP to me personally! But….it’s in your bike, so that’s OK…but you are promoting other to use these CRAP parts in their bikes. What or who’s responsible for the engine damage when that part lets go and takes out the entire top end of their engines? You? Dual SportPlus? I bet neither will step up to the plate and help that poor guy to help pay to buy a new engine. I have seen what damage a broken DOO will cause and how much it costs to repair such damage…it ain’t cheap …..so please stop promoting chinese off shore inferior copies of good solidly made products just to save a buck or two. [/quote]

    Your argument can be applied to pretty well any aftermarket part. Again if you know of any documented failures of this part then please forward. “It screams CRAP to me personally” isn’t really a good argument. I can reassure you that if that or any other part that we use gives us trouble then we’ll report it here. After all, that’s the purpose of all this.

    [quote] Thanks for reading….sorry can’t offer any more help to your readers as I can’t help if this is how you are going to conduct your build. You also might research the DynoJet kit and the size of the hole in your slider???…lol. 1/8 is too big.

    Hey but who am I…a nobody who has zero experience modifying KLRs….with zero knowledge of what works best with what mods and why.

    Sorry to RANT but this is just not right. [/quote]

    These articles will be poorer for the lack of your input/rants …

  18. Hmmmm….?
    You go and buy, get given a substandard internal engine part and say it’s as good as the original developer and manufacturer of the AKA DOO-hickey, Eagle Mike who you do acknowledge as who he is the person who designed and perfected this part, but only to buy the cheaper product and then steal his instuctions to install the torsion spring??? WTF??? If I were to install a lesser strength item inside my engine and advertise it as good as needed when I knew it was a copy of the original made off shore to only save money…..a few dollars at that….what a shame when you have such a large audience watching this article with such interest. Yes I can see that you are trying to do this on the shoestring budget and have no issue using chinese crap on the outside of the engine such as crash bars, racks etc, but internal engine parts??? Come on….Just to save a few bucks? You do know of the issue at hand here as you have skirted it with your comments in your article. Then you use Eagle Mike’s instructions to install the copies of his products!!! WTF? Didn’t they send you any instructions with the copies? I guess to save more money…? If they are trying to save money not sending instructions, what does that say about the quality of that internal engine part? It screams CRAP to me personally! But….it’s in your bike, so that’s OK…but you are promoting other to use these CRAP parts in their bikes. What or who’s responsible for the engine damage when that part lets go and takes out the entire top end of their engines? You? Dual SportPlus? I bet neither will step up to the plate and help that poor guy to help pay to buy a new engine. I have seen what damage a broken DOO will cause and how much it costs to repair such damage…it ain’t cheap …..so please stop promoting chinese off shore inferior copies of good solidly made products just to save a buck or two.

    Thanks for reading….sorry can’t offer any more help to your readers as I can’t help if this is how you are going to conduct your build. You also might research the DynoJet kit and the size of the hole in your slider???…lol. 1/8 is too big.

    Hey but who am I…a nobody who has zero experience modifying KLRs….with zero knowledge of what works best with what mods and why.

    Sorry to RANT but this is just not right.

  19. Great article and looking forward to seeing the finished product.
    On the exhaust, why not try the free cobra you already have…new
    Packing and maybe a db dog. I’m not one for loud pipes and have the
    db killers in my 950 with good results. This gives you the weight saveing
    And saves the buget for the luggage mods.
    Pop me an email if you need a hand, I’m just over hill in Memramcook.

    Brad

  20. I will be interested to see how your mileage changes.
    I made similar mods to my DR650 – jet kit and removing the box side cover. I eventually went back to stock, as the increase in noise and fuel use was more than the modest power increase was worth.

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